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Geological Evidences for Noah’s Flood in Calgary

There are two outstanding outcrop sites in Calgary, Alberta that I have identified as Flood Deposits. The Mazama volcanic ash is a major constituent of these deposits. The ash can be traced to Mount Mazama (Crater Lake) in the State of Oregon, USA. Geologists are able to trace this whitish ash into southern B.C. and as far northeast as the McMurray Tar Sands, Alberta and into areas of Saskatchewan. It is present throughout Montana and can be traced into Nevada and as far east as the State of Nebraska. This ash layer is a useful horizon marker throughout this entire region. The definite identification of the Mazama ash is its chemical composition and the refractive index of the volcanic glass.

The Mazama ash is dated by geologists at about 6,600 years before the present. (See www.Mazama ash.). This is a tentative not an absolute date. A slight correction to the carbon 14 dating method could change this date to anywhere from 6600 to 4500 years before the present.

The Mazama strata in Calgary have all the characteristics of a Flood Deposit. It is Post Pleistocene. Its timing is remarkably close to the Biblical Flood of Noah. On this basis and together with the record of geology worldwide (Figure 1), I am dating this ash and conglomeritic deposit at about 4,500 years before the present.

In most places throughout the world the Flood Disaster Scenario can be divided into three separate stages. The Mazama deposits in Calgary relate to Stages One & Two of Noah’s Disaster Flood Scenario. Stage Three deposits relate to the final stages of the Flood. It is characterized by widespread surface erosion. Stage Three is the result of a series of immense and powerful tidal waves (tsunami type) that swept across Calgary, all of North America and all of the world resulting in the cutting of deep channels and causing widespread surface erosion. The bottom of the Stage Three river channels have varying thicknesses of boulders, cobblestones, pebbles, sandstones, siltstones and clay deposits. The deposits differ from the Mazama deposits in that white volcanic ash and white calcareous precipitates are generally absent. There are reworked boulders, cobblestones and pebbles from Stage One that are deposited with them.

I believe all of the above mentioned surface deposits namely, Stage one, two and three are directly related to Noah’s Flood for the following reasons:

  1. The Masama deposits in Calgary are between a few inches in thickness to over 20 feet. They are quite widely distributed throughout the City, being absent in places due to erosion and / or non-deposition. They are lying upon an eroded surface of Pleistocene glacial till and /or glacial lake sediments that vary in thickness up to 150+ feet. The Pleistocene sediments are, in turn, resting upon a very uneven older erosional surface of the geologic formation called the Paskapoo Sandstone of Paleocene Age. The Paskapoo Sandstone outcrop in the Nose Hill Park and in the Coach Hill area. Many Paskapoo glacial erratics of light brown sandstone are found within the glacial till.
  2. The Masama deposits can be subdivided into two major units. The lower conglomerate unit relates to Stage One of Noah’s Flood. This lower unit consists of whitish gray sub-rounded boulders and cobblestones ranging from two inches to greater than two feet in diameter coated with a white, calcareous volcanic ash precipitate with a pebble-stone and sandy infill. This unit can be a few inches thick to over 5 feet. High energy conditions were required to have distributed these boulders over wide regional areas. Powerful tidal (tsunami) waves would have been necessary to carry these massive boulders to their resting place. A sharp break separates this lower unit from the underlying Glacial drift and glacial lake sediments. A sharp break also separates this unit from the overlying Stage Two deposit.
  3. Stage Two consists of a finer sequence of sandstone mixed with light gray to white colored volcanic ash and silty clay. It grades upwards into a whitish gray, silty clay with abundant volcanic ash in certain intervals. As the Flood waters quickly rose to greater depths, the erosive power of the Flood waters would have decreased on the earth’s surface. The deeper waters would have allowed the finer silts and clays to settle out last.
  4. During Stage Two of the Flood, the waters would have risen to great depths, thus allowing a period of relative calmness and Quiescence to prevail throughout the Earth. The Stage Two unit of the Masama deposit can be up to five feet in thickness. It is always eroded at the top, so may have been much thicker originally.
  5. During the initial time period of Stage One all land animals, land birds and Pre-Flood Man would have perished almost instantly. Water life such as invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, water mammals, water birds, microscopic forms of life would have been able to survive for the most part in a water environment. Geology has documented the sudden demise or extinctions of animal life at this time. Prior to about 4,500 years ago, in America alone, there were great herds of camel, horses, extinct species of buffalo, elephants such as the woolly mammoth and the mastodon, the sabre-tooth tiger, giant sloths, a lion, a pig six feet high etc. together with pre-Flood Man. They all mysteriously disappeared at this time in Alberta as well as throughout the world.
  6. Stage Three of the Flood witnessed the greatest and most dramatic erosive damage throughout the earth. As the Flood Waters began to decrease, there were various stages of still stand where shorelines were formed. For instance in England and Europe, geologists have described various mysterious shorelines above sea level. Some are over a thousand feet above sea level. These shorelines have been described in all areas of the world. Each time great crustal adjustments took place in ocean regions, powerful tsunami waves would have swept across the earth. See the article on “The Mechanics of the Flood.” in Newsletter vol.12, no.2 @ www.gira.ca
  7. During Stage Three numerous tsunami tidal waves would have carved extensive deep and shallow river channels in Calgary and elsewhere. These valley systems were at that time filled with rushing water. Deposits up to 10 to 20 feet or more of boulders, gravels, sands, silts and clays are often present at their base. Most of the Stage One and Stage Two Flood Deposits were in most places eroded away. It is, indeed, a miracle that any of the Stage One & Two deposits were preserved, because of the extensive and dramatic erosion that resulted from Stage Three. This becomes very noticeable when we observe the way Stage One & Two deposits have been truncated by deep river valleys. Some of the reworked boulders and gravels are remnants of Stage One. However, most of the boulders infilling these channels do not have a volcanic coating. Some of them have a characteristic slight reddish stain. This is also a regional and worldwide phenomenon of significant importance. (see article on China Tectites and reddish clays @ www.gira.ca,China)
  8. If geologists do not acknowledge the reality of Noah’s Flood, then they must explain where the large amounts of high-energy water came from to deposit these sediments and to cause the subsequent deep and widespread erosion. This all occurred Post Pleistocene, that is after the Ice Age till and glacial lake sediments had been deposited (Figure 1). Geologically, this event had to have occurred sometime within the last 6,000 years before the present.

Locations of Flood Deposits in Calgary

Presented here is a discussion of the evidence for flood deposits at two locations within Calgary: the Fish Creek Site, and Shouldice Park Site.

Fish Creek Site #1

The Fish Creek Site #1 is located within the Fish Creek Provincial Park between Woodlands and Evergreen in southwest Calgary. Take 24th St. south to Fish Creek parking lot. Then walk east to outcrop.

The Fish Creek Site #1 is located within the Fish Creek Provincial Park between Woodlands and Evergreen in southwest Calgary. Take 24th St. south to Fish Creek parking lot. Then walk east to outcrop.

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Photo #1 of Fish Creek Flood Deposit: Direct evidences of Stages 1, 2 &, 3 are present on this photo. When beds 1&2 were deposited about 4500 years ago, they would have extended across the valley. The severe surface erosion resulting from Stage Three of the Flood is responsible for the formation of the Fish Creek Valley and the erosional truncation of beds 1 & 2.

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Note: The sharp break at the base of Stage Two reveals the underlying boulders, cobblestones, pebbles, sands of Stage One that are all coated with varying amounts of white calcareous volcanic ash precipitate. The chemical composition and the reflective index of the volcanic glass serve for the definite identification of the Mazama ash.

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Shouldice Park Site #2: Flood deposits

This map shows the location of the Shouldice Park Site.

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Photo #5: This is a typical example of the Stage Two Flood Deposit at Shouldice Park site #1. It is about five feet thick and consists of finer fractions of sands and silts embedded in light gray clay that has varying amounts of whitish volcanic ash. Some thin white layers are very rich in volcanic ash. There are pebbles present near base. Stage One boulders underlie Stage two beds. It consists of boulders, cobblestones, pebbles and sands that are coated with varying amounts of a white calcareous volcanic (Mazama ash) precipitate. These boulders are in turn resting upon Glacial lake sediments and in other places boulder clay.

Photo #5: This is a typical example of the Stage Two Flood Deposit at Shouldice Park site #1. It is about five feet thick and consists of finer fractions of sands and silts embedded in light gray clay that has varying amounts of whitish volcanic ash. Some thin white layers are very rich in volcanic ash. There are pebbles present near base. Stage One boulders underlie Stage two beds. It consists of boulders, cobblestones, pebbles and sands that are coated with varying amounts of a white calcareous volcanic (Mazama ash) precipitate. These boulders are in turn resting upon Glacial lake sediments and in other places boulder clay.

Photo #6: shows the abundant boulders and gravels that have been eroded away from the Stage One beds. These have been strewn along the lower flanks of the valley mixing with the waters of the Bow River. The intensity of surface erosion resulting from Stage Three tsunami Tidal Waves have resulted in the widely incised river channel through which the Bow River presently flows.

Photo #6: shows the abundant boulders and gravels that have been eroded away from the Stage One beds. These have been strewn along the lower flanks of the valley mixing with the waters of the Bow River. The intensity of surface erosion resulting from Stage Three tsunami Tidal Waves have resulted in the widely incised river channel through which the Bow River presently flows.

 

Photo #7: Ornamental Rocks

Photo #7: Ornamental Rocks

Throughout the City of Calgary the Stage One boulders, cobblestones and pebbles are used for ornamental purposes in residential and business places. The city uses them to for ornamental purposes at cloverleaf intersections and for supporting LRT railways and much more. The above rocks were used by the city to support the LRT railway at Shawnessy.

last updated: March 7, 2013
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