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Bridging The Gap Vol. 13 No. 1

This issue of Bridging The Gap presents exciting information about the Burgess Shale. The Burgess Shale is a black shale fossil bed named after Burgess Pass, close to where it was found, high up in the Canadian Rockies in Yoho National Park near the town of Field, British Columbia. Fossils were first found in the Burgess Shale in 1909 by Charles Doolittle Walcott, who returned in the following years to collect additional specimens. Walcott recognized the arthropod fossils were new and unique species, but careful reexaminations showed that many in fact constituted entire new phyla of life, and even today some have proven impossible to classify. The fossils are especially valuable because they include appendages and soft parts that are rarely preserved.

  • Why is the Burgess Shale so special The primary reason why the Burgess Shale is so special is because it was at this time that God established a plan for all future animal life on earth. The Burgess Shale at Field, B.C., Canada contains an amazing record of the great diversity of life that suddenly came into existence at the time of ...
  • Burgess Shale Trip On July 19 to 24, 2002 we had the privilege of hosting a geological tour of Field, BC. Two prominent geologists shared the description of the geology along the way through the Foothills and the spectacular Canadian Rockies to Field and Emerald Lake. A geological guide book was presented to the different persons on the ...